How Gay Teens Might Feel

Do they have feelings? Yes. Yes they do.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author’s. If you have any dispute with the content of this article please feel free to message your concerns.

“To any problem they might have: You’re gay shut up.”

“HOW IS THAT AN EXCUSE TO NOT DISCUSS THEIR ISSUES”

Like their straight peers, gay teens may stress about school, grades, college, sports, activities, friends, and fitting in. But in addition, gay and lesbian teens often deal with an extra layer of stress — like whether they have to hide who they are, whether they will be harassed about being gay, or whether they will face stereotypes or judgments if they are honest about who they are.

They are your child. Send them away with happiness, not sadness.

They often feel different from their friends when the heterosexual people around them start talking about romantic feelings, dating, and sex. For them, it can feel like everyone is expected to be straight. They may feel like they have to pretend to feel things that they don’t in order to fit in. They might feel they need to deny who they are or hide an important part of themselves.

Many gay teens worry about whether they will be accepted or rejected by their loved ones, or whether people will feel upset, angry, or disappointed in them. These fears of prejudice, discrimination, rejection, or violence, can lead some teens who aren’t straight to keep their sexual orientation secret, even from friends and family who might be supportive.

It can take time for gay teens to process how they feel and to accept this aspect of their own identity before they reveal their sexual orientation to others. Many decide to tell a few accepting, supportive friends and family members about their sexual orientation. This is called coming out.

For most people, coming out takes courage. In some situations, teens who are openly gay may risk facing more harassment than those who haven’t revealed their sexual orientation. But many lesbian, gay, and bisexual teens who come out to their friends and families are fully accepted by them and their communities. They feel comfortable and secure about being attracted to people of the same gender. In a recent survey, teens who had come out reported feeling happier and less stressed than those who hadn’t.

There’s a difference between holding and not letting go.

How Parents Might Feel

Adolescence is a time of transition not just for teens, but for their parents too. Many parents face their teen’s emerging sexuality with a mix of confusion and worry. They may feel completely unprepared for this next stage of parenthood. And if their child is gay, it may bring a whole new set of questions and concerns.

Some are surprised to learn the truth, always having thought their child was straight. Others wonder whether the news is really true and whether their teen is sure. They might wonder if they did something to cause their child to be gay — but they shouldn’t. There is no evidence that being gay is the result of the way that someone was raised.

Fortunately, many parents of gay teens understand and are accepting right from the start. They feel they have known all along, even before their teen came out to them. They often feel glad that their child chose to confide in them, and are proud of their child for having the courage to tell them.

Other parents feel upset, disappointed, or unable to accept their teen’s sexual orientation at first. They may be concerned or worried about whether their son or daughter will be bullied, mistreated, or marginalized. And they might feel protective, worrying that others might judge or reject their child. Some also struggle to reconcile their teen’s sexual orientation with their religious or personal beliefs. Sadly, some react with anger, hostility, or rejection.

Let them paint their life with as many colours as they want. Help them wash up afterwards but don’t stop them from exploring.

But many parents find that they just need time to adjust to the news. That’s where support groups and other organizations can help. It can be reassuring for them to learn about openly gay people who lead happy, successful lives.

With time, even parents who thought they couldn’t possibly accept their teen’s sexual orientation are surprised to find that they can reach a place of understanding.

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