The Liberated Wife

It started with the furniture.

She hated every last bit of it. Large, bulky, horrendous furniture, she had no choice but to put in her house. After all, her fiancée had paid for it, and they would live here together after marriage. It was just so…big. All these heavy masculine pieces and it made her feel clumsy and awkward.

When asked about it by her betrothed, she smiled and nodded, just like mama said.

She’d also said he was a good catch, and they weren’t likely to find such a compatible match anywhere else. Mama never gave her much credit; she knew nobody cared about compatibility in their world. He didn’t ask for a dowry, because he was a successful man, ran an apothecary all by himself. Grew his own medicine, and the rest was imported. A remarkable tradesman, her younger sister had fawned. If she liked him, his ridiculous furniture, and the apothecary which made her sneeze every time she was in it, the little chit could have him. Unfortunately, the eldest was stuck with the curse of being carted off to the other side of the country, whereas the youngest was more likely to enjoy days of her freedom before marrying some sweetheart.

She had a duty to her aging mother. Well aware that this marriage prospect would secure her mother’s health, and position, she’d agreed despite being slightly uncertain of the whole thing.

Then, it was the location. He’d decided they would put the new furniture to good use in his apartments, the ones above the apothecary. She should’ve put her foot down, and demanded that he couldn’t make her live in that odd smelling place during her married life. It was when she was penning down exactly what she thought of him deciding her future on a whim that she looked at her mother. Widowed too early, she’d been running a small trading business all by herself to support her two young daughters. She deserved better, especially when her future husband could work wonders for her mother’s trade that would eventually be passed onto her little sister, and her spouse.

At this point, she was utterly uninterested in the whole thing.

She would fulfill her obligation to become a bride, and then…what? What did people do after marriage? She supposed they could have children, but he had expressed disinterest at the prospect of raising children.

That was quite alright, but as long as she didn’t have to dabble in medicine making, she would make do.

After the wedding however, she was thoroughly dissatisfied with her new life. The wretched man paid her no mind! In fact, he spent more time with his mother-in-law, than he did with his wife. They talked business all day, and their efforts were reflected in flourishing trade on either end. It was just…

Now, she couldn’t understand why she was complaining.

So many women wanted exactly what she had; a husband who had no requests or demands to make from her, who joined her for meals, and didn’t particularly make much conversation, was always polite and never lost his temper, allotted her spending money, and freedom to do what she pleased.

As a means to show gratitude, she would always keep the house smelling fresh with floral scents when she found out he preferred Lavender. He began to work more hours, and they shifted residences. This one was enormous, even if it meant she never got to see him.

Apart from that, she rather enjoyed her walks in the park and reclining against the massive furniture, reading a book. She’d read so many – a privilege she enjoyed for people left a lot for the wife of their healer – that she decided to write one too.

The first drop of ink splashed across an empty white page was the most liberating of them all.

The doctors sighed at her condition. After accidentally killing her husband in self-defense, she’d created an alternative reality. Perhaps, it was for the best; the book she was writing was rather entertaining.

2 Comments

  1. Quite poorly written.

    The sentences with grey background and blue verical border on one side are part of the story or advertisements for something else?

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