The Problem With Our Education System

Here’s the tea on everything wrong with our education system.

If one were to start listing down everything wrong with the way we’re being educated in Pakistan, this author would run out of ink – but criticisms aren’t this author’s forte and she will not venture to go into the details of an issue that we all understand perfectly well but don’t want to change. Our biggest problem? The way we’re being taught.

Now many will argue that everybody is taught just the way we are, all over the globe, why does Pakistan experience all the negative consequences? My reply to these people is thus, our education system is worse than that of the world. It’s not free, unlike many countries. It does not encourage children to think for themselves and it certainly does not breed creativity of any kind.

We have a special knack for not only recognizing talent but scurrying to squash it the moment it tries to emerge from its cocoon; simply because of the fact that we absolutely cannot tolerate an anomaly.

Our ways of teaching and even our schools are astonishing in their emptiness; either we have underqualified teachers taking on subjects beyond their reach or we have fully qualified teachers not showing up to their jobs, disillusioned with the whole system.

Another issue that this author finds most disturbing is the rampant elitism that cannot be found in our institutes, the best educational institutes crush their students with their skyrocketing tuition fees or better yet, only allow those students to study whose parents can fill the school’s treasures with as much money as they demand. It takes perfectly undeserving students within its folds, trains them to flaunt the name of their school around and get jobs which should have gone to better, more deserving people. The scholarships and financial aids we offer our students are truly laughable; a way to not only ridicule them for not having as much money as others but to make them constantly realize that the only way that they were actually able to afford to study at this prestigious institution is because the administration was benevolent enough to let them.

If this doesn’t disillusion the deserving then what does?

The stark contrast between public and private schools is also lamentable; what this author fails to understand is why educational institutes admit students based on their grades and money instead of coming up with a creative way to assess who actually deserves to study for free and utilize elite services to further advance their knowledge of the world.

Public schools make one despair of everything, from the half-finished classrooms to the under qualified teachers and to the students sitting out in the open, battling fleas, waiting for the day they will actually be able to get some knowledge on their hands.

The way we teach is also pathetic; our teachers hate students who dare use a different method than theirs, try to crawl out of the mold that everyone wants them to fit into. We normalize a hatred of study in boys, saying it’s only natural that they should simply because it is so deeply ingrained in their nature. So many wrong things with the way we use knowledge as a weapon to make money and make money alone.

What will become of this system, this author does not know? Hope only keeps us afloat.

Rant over.

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